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Alzheimer’s Disease

Who Navigates More Effectively: Men or Women? (Part 2 of 2)

Posted by on Jan 6, 2016 in Alzheimer's Disease, cognitive maps, disorientation, gender differences in navigation, hippocampus, personal navigation, Wayfinding, wayfinding and the brain | 0 comments

Who Navigates More Effectively: Men or Women? (Part 2 of 2)

In the study referenced in the previous blog post (Who Navigates More Effectively: Men or Women? (Part 1 of 2)), medical doctor and PhD candidate, Carl Pintzka, at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim used an MRI scanner to monitor brain activity when 18 men and 18 women used 3D goggles and a joystick to orient themselves in a large virtual maze. He found that men were more effective and, in a followup study, when women were given a single drop of the male hormone,...

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New Research Focuses on Wayfinding by People with Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted by on Oct 24, 2013 in Alzheimer's Disease, research, Wayfinding, wayfinding and the brain | 0 comments

New Research Focuses on Wayfinding by People with Alzheimer’s Disease

The more we know about how humans are able to find their way (and why we get lost), the better chance we have of making navigation easier for everyone. A story by Lisa Ermak about research underway concerning wayfinding for people with Alzheimer’s disease appears on HollandSentinel.com. Associate Professor of Nursing at Grand Valley State University, Rebecca Davis, is using projected virtual reality and eye-tracking glasses to study how people with Alzheimer’s perceive their surroundings...

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