Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On LinkedinVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our Feed

cognitive maps

Which is More Confusing: Initial Wayfinding or Wayfinding Revisited?

Posted by on Jan 31, 2016 in cognitive maps, disorientation, getting lost, maps, navigation, subways, transit maps | 0 comments

Which is More Confusing: Initial Wayfinding or Wayfinding Revisited?

Which do you find more confusing: going to a place you’ve never visited before or going to a place you once knew well, but that has changed significantly? In an opinion piece in The New York Times, “London Lost and Found,” Mahesh Rao describes his literal and figurative confusion as he revisits London once or twice a year after he moved from there to India in 2008. As a visitor he looks more intently and sees small sights he missed when he was a resident. Rather than taking things for...

Read More

Who Navigates More Effectively: Men or Women? (Part 2 of 2)

Posted by on Jan 6, 2016 in Alzheimer's Disease, cognitive maps, disorientation, gender differences in navigation, hippocampus, personal navigation, Wayfinding, wayfinding and the brain | 0 comments

Who Navigates More Effectively: Men or Women? (Part 2 of 2)

In the study referenced in the previous blog post (Who Navigates More Effectively: Men or Women? (Part 1 of 2)), medical doctor and PhD candidate, Carl Pintzka, at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim used an MRI scanner to monitor brain activity when 18 men and 18 women used 3D goggles and a joystick to orient themselves in a large virtual maze. He found that men were more effective and, in a followup study, when women were given a single drop of the male hormone,...

Read More

What Does a Mental Map Look Like in 3D?

Posted by on Feb 5, 2015 in cognitive maps, maps, wayfinding and the brain | 0 comments

What Does a Mental Map Look Like in 3D?

As we skillfully or fitfully make our way from here to there, most of us develop some sort of mental images of the routes we travel. While we may come to “know” certain routes after repeated use, we can’t always communicate them well. Verbal descriptions may be imprecise and drawings may be, well, sketchy. Enter Claire Sauvaget, a French digital artist, who has devised a new way to depict her pedestrian commute using 3D-printed models. While the aptly titled “Mental Map” is a work of...

Read More

“Mapping the City” Exhibit in London, England

Posted by on Jan 28, 2015 in cognitive maps, maps, museum exhibition, personal navigation | 0 comments

“Mapping the City” Exhibit in London, England

An exhibit in London, England, called “Mapping the City” turns the concept of geographically accurate maps into something quite different. In the Somerset House show, some 50 international graffiti and street artists use a variety of media to create visual representations of spaces that are reflect emotions, personal meaning, and private references. The free exhibit runs from January 22-February 15, 2015. There are also several related events, hosted by University College London...

Read More

London Cabbies Describe Finding Their Way Along a Complex Route

Posted by on Jan 20, 2015 in cognitive maps, Directional Sense, Finding your way as you drive, hippocampus, navigation, Wayfinding, wayfinding and the brain | 0 comments

London Cabbies Describe Finding Their Way Along a Complex Route

Directionally challenged people have to work hard to learn even short routes between places they frequent. And this is a great accomplishment! Would-be and actual London taxi drivers are at the opposite end of the wayfinding spectrum, probably as a result of outstanding, inherent spatial abilities, and absolutely as a result of years of dedicated, focused, arduous work. This New York Times video shows images along a seven-mile route through London and the 41(!) turns required to get from one...

Read More

“The Knowledge” – The Ultimate Test of London’s Detailed Geography

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in asking directions, cognitive maps, Directional Sense, Directionally challenged, Finding your way as you drive, navigation, personal navigation, Uncategorized, wayfinding and the brain | 0 comments

“The Knowledge” – The Ultimate Test of London’s Detailed Geography

If you’ve ever wondered whether there’s a wayfinding Olympics, take a look at this extraordinary New York Times article by Jody Rosen describing the years of detailed navigation & wayfinding study (and resulting sacrifices) undertaken by people seeking to be official London taxi drivers. “The Knowledge,” has been called the most difficult mental undertaking and test in the world: requiring students to memorize the city’s 25,000 streets and every business and landmark on them....

Read More